Ocean Currents

Donate Today

Ocean Currents

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

//

Cruising the Northwest Passage: A Symbol of a Rapidly Changing Arctic

Posted On August 17, 2016 by

Photo: Ocean Conservancy / Sarah Bobbe

SEWARD, ALASKA – Small only in comparison to the rocky peaks surrounding the city, the cruise ship Crystal Serenity easily dwarfed every other structure in Seward, Alaska. On August 16, she slipped her moorings and started a month-long voyage through the Northwest Passage with over 1,700 passengers and crew onboard. 

This is an important milestone to us. The impact of climate change has now ushered in an era where a luxury cruise ship is able to sail from the North Pacific to the Atlantic via the fabled Northwest Passage—a route that once defeated even the most intrepid explorers. While other vessels have made the transit, this is the first time a tour ship of this size—almost the length of three football fields—has attempted the passage. Crystal Serenity’s journey is yet another symbol of a rapidly changing Arctic.

Continue reading »

Exploring Icebergs in Our Nation’s Capital

Posted On August 6, 2016 by

When the heat index is well over 100 degrees, Washington, D.C. locals will do whatever it takes to stay cool. This summer, the National Building Museum is making it easier than ever to escape the heat—by bringing an icy environment straight to our backyard.

Their new exhibit, Icebergs, is a massive installation that allows visitors to immerse themselves in a polar ecosystem. Designed by James Corner Field Operations, the tallest iceberg stretches 56’ high to the third story of the museum and allows panoramic views from high above the “ocean” surface. The entire system is built from re-usable construction materials, such as scaffolding and polycarbonate paneling.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

Poles Apart: The Differences between Antarctica and the Arctic

Posted On June 30, 2016 by

This blog was written by Roger Di Silvestro, a field correspondent for Ocean Conservancy.

Have you ever seen a cartoon or advertisement that showed penguins and polar bears cavorting together in the snow?

On the flip side, have you ever seen a documentary film that showed penguins and polar bears together in the wild? Didn’t think so, since they live poles apart. Nevertheless, not everyone (advertisers included) understands the difference between Antarctica and the Arctic. Here are eight ways to tell them apart.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

10 Things to Know About the Walrus

Posted On May 19, 2016 by

This blog was written by Roger Di Silvestro, a field correspondent for Ocean Conservancy.

When you think of walruses, you may picture their tusks—the huge pinniped’s most familiar characteristic. But there is so much more to these “elephants of the sea”! Here are some less-obvious facts about these ice-dwelling creatures.

1. Biologists classify the walrus as a carnivore, or meat eater, which puts the animal in the same broad category as wolves, foxes and lions.

2. The polar bear, weighing as much as 1,200 pounds, is often touted as North America’s largest terrestrial carnivore. But it’s a mere wisp compared to the ocean-going male walrus, which can tip the scales in excess of 3,700 pounds.

Continue reading »

Icy Waters for Shell

Posted On May 10, 2016 by

Yesterday, Shell gave up almost all of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea. This marks another nail in the coffin for risky offshore oil drilling in the Arctic.

But Shell still has one lease remaining in the Chukchi Sea, along with leases in the Beaufort Sea off northern Alaska. What’s more, the Obama Administration is still considering whether to allow the sale of more offshore oil leases in Arctic waters.

There is too much at stake to risk additional leasing. Will you join us in protecting our Arctic by taking action today?

Some of the world’s largest seabird populations congregate in the Arctic. Iconic wildlife thrives in this amazing ecosystem, including polar bears, beluga whales and ringed seals.

Please take action by asking the Obama Administration to drop Arctic leasing from the final version of the 2017 to 2022 leasing program.

1
Comment

Photos: Life in the Arctic

Posted On April 27, 2016 by

My name is Sarah Bobbe and I am Ocean Conservancy’s Arctic Program Specialist based in Anchorage, Alaska. TIn case you missed it, this week I took over the Ocean Conservancy Instagram account, and wanted to post the images here! I am thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my passion for the Arctic and the conservation of this region with you all.

Continue reading »

Arctic Wildlife: Get to Know the Insect of the Sea, Arctic Copepods

Posted On April 7, 2016 by

Our blog series on the lesser known (but just as cool) species of the Arctic continues with Arctic copepods. Read our other blogs from the series: polar cod and brittle stars.

I’ve always loved ribbon seals, narwhals and ringed seals to name a few cute Arctic creatures. While these beautiful animals get all the glory, they wouldn’t be around for these important little guys at the base of the food chain: meet the copepod!

“Copepod” means oar-footed, and that is how these aquatic crustaceans, often called “insects of the sea” move around. They use their four to five pairs of legs as well as their mouth and tail to swim. In the Arctic, copepods live on the seafloor, in the water column and on the sea ice. In the water column, there are more copepods than any other multi-cellular organism.

Copepods come in many forms—some are filter feeders, some are predators. Copepods have two major life forms and grow by shedding their shell. They go through 12 stages after hatching—that’s a lot of wardrobe changes! By our standards, copepods are tiny, measuring in at 0.3 to 2cm long at full size.

Continue reading »