Ocean Currents » take action http://blog.oceanconservancy.org News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy Thu, 28 Jul 2016 16:57:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 New Ocean Plan is History in the Making http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/07/18/new-ocean-plan-is-history-in-the-making/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/07/18/new-ocean-plan-is-history-in-the-making/#comments Mon, 18 Jul 2016 13:32:37 +0000 Anne Merwin http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=12410

The summer sizzle has arrived and I have some hot news to share with you: The nation’s first regional ocean plan was just released in New England! This plan is a huge win for the Atlantic Ocean and everything that lives in it.

I couldn’t be more excited about this news!! But, I need your help to make sure the plan turns into real action on the water and not just words on a paper. Will you take action today?

I depend on an organized plan to help me get through a busy day—it’s the same with the ocean (and quite a bit more important)! We need a smart ocean plan to help organize and balance the many ocean uses like shipping, fishing and recreation—all while keeping marine ecosystems healthy and in balance. It’s a lot to organize!! But, this ocean plan is more than up to the task.

But time is running out! The comment period is only open until July 25, so you must add your voice now!

From its sandy beaches to kelp forests, New England is a beautiful and diverse environment home to thousands of marine species. But there are changes occurring; some we can see, and some we can’t. As our natural ecosystem changes, how we use the ocean changes, too. That makes this ocean plan and sound management more critical than ever.

Summer is slipping by fast—and so is this comment period! Don’t miss out. Can I count on your help today to tell the Regional Planning Body that you support their work on smart ocean planning.

The plan is a huge stride towards smarter ocean planning—a process that benefits both the ocean environment and communities that rely on a healthy ocean for enjoyment and their livelihoods.

Thank you so much for your help.

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Leaving the Arctic http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/06/09/leaving-the-arctic/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/06/09/leaving-the-arctic/#comments Thu, 09 Jun 2016 17:44:53 +0000 Andrew Hartsig http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=12256

The news from the Arctic this week has been all about what’s leaving the Arctic. It’s good news when oil and gas companies leave the Arctic, but it’s really bad news when sea ice leaves the Arctic!!

First, let’s get to the good news. Repsol, an oil and gas company, just announced it’s abandoning 55 of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea and plans to abandon the remaining 38 over the next year. In addition, ConocoPhillips, Eni, Iona Energy and Shell have given up more than 350 leases covering more than 2 million acres in the Chukchi Sea. Soon, there will be only one lease remaining in the Chukchi Sea—and additional drilling on that lease is unlikely.

While oil and gas companies have largely given up their oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea, active offshore leases still threaten the Beaufort Sea off the coast of northeastern Alaska. What’s more, the Obama Administration is still considering whether to allow the sale of more offshore oil leases in Arctic waters.

But, you can do something about it! Join us in protecting our Arctic by taking action today! Please take action by asking the Obama Administration to drop Arctic leasing from the final version of the 2017 to 2022 leasing program.

What about the sea ice? That news is not so good: Arctic sea ice extent hit a depressing new low in May. The Washington Post described it in these terms: “The Arctic Ocean this May had more than three Californias less sea ice cover than it did during an average May between 1981 and 2010.”

That’s just the latest bad news. 2016 as a whole hasn’t been a good year for Arctic sea ice; there were record low levels of sea ice extent in January, February and April, too. As the affects of climate change continue to be felt all across our planet, the Arctic is ground zero.

Do we truly know how magnificent the Arctic is—or what’s at stake if we lose more habitat in this precious region of the Earth?

That’s why I want to invite you to join us this summer as we explore the Arctic Ocean in a new blog series. You’ll get to discover some of the world’s largest congregations of seabirds, and learn how iconic wildlife — like polar bears, beluga whales and ringed seals — live in this varied and rapidly changing ocean ecosystem.

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Icy Waters for Shell http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/05/10/icy-waters-for-shell/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/05/10/icy-waters-for-shell/#comments Tue, 10 May 2016 19:22:56 +0000 Andrew Hartsig http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=12051

Yesterday, Shell gave up almost all of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea. This marks another nail in the coffin for risky offshore oil drilling in the Arctic.

But Shell still has one lease remaining in the Chukchi Sea, along with leases in the Beaufort Sea off northern Alaska. What’s more, the Obama Administration is still considering whether to allow the sale of more offshore oil leases in Arctic waters.

There is too much at stake to risk additional leasing. Will you join us in protecting our Arctic by taking action today?

Some of the world’s largest seabird populations congregate in the Arctic. Iconic wildlife thrives in this amazing ecosystem, including polar bears, beluga whales and ringed seals.

Please take action by asking the Obama Administration to drop Arctic leasing from the final version of the 2017 to 2022 leasing program.

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Little Fish. Big Deal. http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/01/24/little-fish-big-deal/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2016/01/24/little-fish-big-deal/#comments Sun, 24 Jan 2016 14:30:51 +0000 Greg Helms http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=11347

We’re making a very big deal about very little fish on the U.S. West Coast—and we hope you’ll do the same! These little fish, called forage fish, are crucial to the overall health of the marine ecosystem of the Pacific Ocean. These fish are important for the survival of seabirds, marine mammals, and bigger fish like salmon, halibut and tuna.

Little Fish. Big Deal. Take action today and let NOAA Fisheries know you support protections for forage fish.

Federal fishery managers are considering a proposed rule to protect seven groups of forage fish species in federal waters off the U.S. West Coast. This action would culminate a years-long process in which environmental organizations, fishery managers and ocean lovers have voiced support for safeguarding forage fish because of their importance to a healthy ocean.

Take action: A little bit of your time would make a big difference for the ocean food web.

Make your voice heard! NOAA Fisheries is only accepting comments for the next week, so please take action today, before the comment period closes!

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Take Action for the Arctic and Atlantic http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/12/07/take-action-for-the-arctic-and-atlantic/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/12/07/take-action-for-the-arctic-and-atlantic/#comments Mon, 07 Dec 2015 14:30:25 +0000 Andrew Hartsig http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=11187

I know I’ve shared a lot of good news about the Arctic with you lately, but the Arctic isn’t safe yet—and now the Atlantic Ocean is also at risk of being opened up to new offshore oil drilling.

That’s because the Obama Administration will soon roll out a new five-year plan that could open up offshore drilling in both the Arctic and the Atlantic—we can’t let that happen.

Take Action: Tell the Administration to leave Arctic and Atlantic offshore drilling OUT of their upcoming plan.

I want to protect Arctic and Atlantic waters from risky offshore drilling not one year at a time, but for many years to come.

We have a great opportunity to do just that: The Administration’s draft of a five-year program will guide decisions about offshore drilling until the year 2022.

The Administration has signaled that the five-year program will include new oil and gas lease sales in both the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans. I need your help once again, to help safeguard the polar bears and walruses that call the Arctic home, as well as the whales and sea turtles that call the Atlantic home.

Here’s how you can help:

Take action and tell the Secretary of the Interior to exclude Arctic and Atlantic leasing when they issue the new draft of the five-year program early next year.

We have less than two months to persuade the Administration before the new plan is rolled out, so please take action today.

It’s time to say no to risky Arctic and Atlantic leasing.

Will you please take a minute to speak up for the Arctic and Atlantic?

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Take Action to Restore the Gulf Beyond the Shore http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/11/20/take-action-to-restore-the-gulf-beyond-the-shore/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/11/20/take-action-to-restore-the-gulf-beyond-the-shore/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2015 20:00:58 +0000 Bethany Kraft http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=11092  

We did it! You asked our Gulf leaders to restore the Gulf beyond the shore, and they heard you! When the details of the $20.8 billion settlement were released last month, more than $1 billion was set aside to restore the open ocean.

But there’s a catch…the Trustees charged with restoring the Gulf have proposed to take ALL of their federal overhead expenses for the next 15 years out of the open ocean fund. That funding is critical for restoring Gulf wildlife in the deep sea, where an area 20 times the size of Manhattan remains polluted with BP oil!

Please join me in taking action to protect the Gulf. Let’s send the Trustees a message: Don’t raid the Gulf’s open ocean fund!

Administrative costs are important to getting the job done right, but paying for federal administrative costs from the money set aside to address all of the impacts to ocean habitats and wildlife will deprive marine life like corals and sea turtles the funding they need to recover from the BP oil disaster.

Tell the Trustees to only use open ocean funds to restore the Gulf beyond the shore.

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Take Action to Help Save Whale Sharks http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/07/10/take-action-to-help-save-whale-sharks/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2015/07/10/take-action-to-help-save-whale-sharks/#comments Fri, 10 Jul 2015 12:00:40 +0000 George Leonard http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=10434

September 4, 2015 update: Thank you to the more than 73,000 people who took action to protect whale sharks. We are currently in direct conversations with the cruise ship industry and we hope to share updates with you soon. Watch this space!

The largest fish in the ocean is one of the most majestic, too: the whale shark. These gentle giants are also in danger.

Right now, there’s a very simple way to protect them, and you can help. Off the coast of Mexico, thousands of whale sharks gather to feed and mate every year. Unfortunately, there are two cruise ship companies whose cruises currently travel through this important area where whale sharks congregate in large numbers and swim slowly at the surface of the water.

The beauty of this area is bringing more and more visitors each year, and unfortunately, they are having some negative effects on the whale sharks. There is an easy step to be taken in protecting whale sharks in this region, and we hope you’ll take just a moment to let Carnival and Royal Caribbean Cruises know how important it is to you that they adjust their course by 7 miles to protect these magnificent animals.


Whale sharks can reach over 40 feet in length, and they swim slowly while close to the surface with their mouths open to eat their staple food source, plankton. This makes them particularly vulnerable to ship strikes, which is why it’s so important to adjust cruise ship routes to protect them.

Ships are currently required by Mexican law to go at least 3 miles east of Isla Contoy, but just 4 additional miles would keep the ships from passing through this critical whale shark area and prevent possible negative interactions with these incredible creatures.

Just 7 miles can save whale sharks. Please encourage Carnival and Royal Caribbean to help make a difference for whale sharks.

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