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Ocean Currents

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

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Advice to a 10-Year-Old Scientist

Posted On March 6, 2017 by

The author as a junior scientist: writing computer programs, collecting specimens and troubleshooting equipment. Courtesy Sarah Cooley.

In honor of International Women’s Day, we’re celebrating stand out #WomeninConservation all week long. Here, Sarah Cooley, Director of our Ocean Acidification Program, writes a letter to her ten-year-old self. Check back every day for new blogs, and don’t forget to join our Twitter chat on Wednesday, March 8th at 1 pm EST! 

Dear Sarah,

I know you’re really busy with fourth grade right now, but I wanted to say “Hi!” from the future and cheer you on. You’re going to be a scientist, but I won’t tell you anything else. I don’t want to give away any of the journey! It’s a fun one. But, I will tell you that some things you’re doing now are really important for becoming me, your future self.

Keep on playing outside. All that wading in the creek behind the house in your rubber boots and looking at bugs and leaves and shiny rocks is going to leave lasting prints on your brain and your heart. Lots of grown-ups forget, or maybe never knew, how awesome the Earth is. So it’s easy for people to take clean water and air for granted. But the world needs you and your friends to remember what healthy creeks and forests and oceans look like so you can fight for them. You’ve got to stand up for nature, because it’s a lot quieter than money and fame. That’s hard work, so you’ve got to keep doing things the hard way, too. When you cross the creek on that shaky rope bridge your brother built, even though you could land in the water, it’s good practice. That’ll give you a taste for adventure, too, which will take you around the world!

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Urgent: Trump Can’t Ignore the Ocean

Posted On January 31, 2017 by

I’m a scientist, and I’ve dedicated my life to finding solutions that help people and coastal communities. It may sound complicated, but really, it’s simple—if you add carbon emissions to seawater, the ocean turns more acidic. I’ve visited with shellfish growers and coastal businesses across the country, and I’ve seen firsthand the impacts of acidification.

So you can imagine my surprise, when Scott Pruitt—the nominee for the head of the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency)—was asked directly by Senators about ocean acidification, he wasn’t even willing to admit that ocean acidification is happening.

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Corals are Like… What?!

Posted On July 25, 2016 by

This week we’re celebrating all things coral! It’s no secret that coral reefs are spectacular ecosystems, but we wanted to do a deep dive into what exactly makes corals so special. Check out nine ways corals are even cooler than you thought:

1)  Corals are like speed bumps. They slow down waves and lessen wave energy. This protects coastlines from hurricanes, cyclones and tsunamis. Coral reefs protect the shoreline in 81 countries around the world, sheltering the 200 million people living along those coasts.

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How Ocean Acidification Impacts Florida’s Ecosystems

Posted On June 15, 2016 by

Reef-building corals find refuge from climate change in mangrove habitats. Photo credit: Caroline Rogers, USGS.

Dr. Kimberly Yates will be a panelist at an ocean acidification roundtable we are hosting in Miami this week. There, she will join other scientists, Florida elected officials and local businesspeople in discussing what ocean acidification has in store for Florida’s marine life and its coastal communities. Follow the meeting on Twitter via #FL_OA on Friday, June 17!

OC: Your research focuses on several marine habitats in Florida: coral reefs, estuaries and mangroves. How are they coping with ocean acidification?

Dr. Yates: Most of what we know about how ocean acidification is affecting these environments comes from experimental research. We know some marine organisms will be negatively impacted, and some may benefit. For example, some species that form their skeletons and shells from minerals made of calcium carbonate, like corals and some shellfish, are negatively impacted. Ocean acidification slows the rate at which they grow their skeletons and shells, and can also cause calcium carbonate minerals to dissolve.

Other species like seagrasses and some marine algae benefit from ocean acidification because it increases their growth rates. Coral reefs have been degrading rapidly over the past few decades, and recent research shows that some reefs in the Florida Keys are beginning to dissolve during certain times of the year from ocean acidification…which was not expected to happen for another few decades. Estuaries and mangrove wetlands support many species of shellfish, and ocean acidification may negatively impact those species and the economies that depend on shell fisheries. We are still learning about how changes caused by ocean acidification are impacting these habitats.

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Will Ocean Acidification Affect Dungeness Crabs?

Posted On May 18, 2016 by

2016 hasn’t been a good year for the West Coast Dungeness crab fishery. The fishing season that typically spans the winter months – worth $212 million in 2014  – got significantly delayed this year when Dungeness crabs tested high for domoic acid, which sickens humans, and managers shut down the fishery. The crabs had fed heartily on a giant toxic bloom of Pseudonitschia algae, which produce domoic acid, and which were thriving in an unusually warm body of water stalled offshore, affectionately called “the blob.” The bloom also shut down other West Coast shellfish fisheries, too. The lost harvests equal lost income for West Coast communities. San Francisco Bay Area crabber John Mellor says, “If crabs were to disappear from the picture, I think it would be the end of my fishing career at this point.”

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West Coast Scientists Weigh Actions Against Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia

Posted On April 4, 2016 by

Ten years ago, I was finishing graduate school. I was becoming an expert on how carbon dioxide is stored in the world’s oceans, but – and this seems weird to me now – I hadn’t heard about ocean acidification. Hardly anyone had. Only a handful of scientists had started to realize that as the ocean sops up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, ocean chemistry changes in ways that can hurt fish, shellfish, and corals.

Just five years later, concern about ocean acidification had grown dramatically, and thousands of people were involved. West Coast shellfish growers were trying to save their hatcheries from the effects of ocean acidification, while scientists were scrambling to offer information and solutions. Ocean Conservancy began working on this issue in 2012, helping bring affected business people, policy makers, and scientists together during the initial search for solutions in Washington State, whose shellfish hatcheries experienced dramatic die-offs of their oyster larvae.

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Ocean Acidification: States Taking Action

Posted On January 27, 2016 by

Ocean acidification is one of those big, scary problems that scientists have been warning us about for years.  Carbon emissions are being absorbed by the ocean, turning it more acidic – spelling trouble for oysters, clams, mussels, as well as corals, salmon and even sharks. We know that reducing global carbon emissions is key to solving ocean acidification.  The UN Climate Meeting in December was a resounding success, but what can people and states do, today, that will make a difference to their communities and businesses impacted by acidification?  Turns out, quite a lot.

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