The Blog Aquatic » Nick Mallos http://blog.oceanconservancy.org News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:32:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Did You Miss Our Ocean Google Hangout? http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/05/22/did-you-miss-our-ocean-google-hangout/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/05/22/did-you-miss-our-ocean-google-hangout/#comments Thu, 22 May 2014 14:26:53 +0000 Michelle Frey http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=8359 As part of the launch campaign for the 2014 Trash Free Seas Data Report, Ocean Conservancy hosted its first-ever Google Hangout! In case you missed it, the broadcast has been archived to our YouTube page here:

And don’t forget to check out the full report on our website.

More about the Ocean Google Hangout:

Trash has infiltrated all reaches of our ocean, causing negative impacts on ocean life and coastal communities. The problem can seem overwhelming, but it is preventable. Ocean Conservancy held a conversation about trash and the ocean. We talked about the ‘just-released’ findings from Ocean Conservancy’s 2013 International Coastal Cleanup. And we heard from a leading scientist and waste management expert about where the solutions to this problem lie. Watch the video and you’ll learn what we’ve discovered, what does it all means and what we can do next?

Moderator:

George Leonard is Chief Scientist at Ocean Conservancy. A long-time scuba diver, George has worked on a range of ocean-related issues including marine debris, sustainable seafood and marine protected areas. During his graduate work, he logged over 400 dives in 3 years studying California’s kelp forests, the undersea equivalent of tropical rain forests.

Speakers:

Nick Mallos is a Conservation Biologist and Marine Debris Specialist at Ocean Conservancy. His travels take him around the world, showing him the final resting place of trash generated by our disposable culture. Nick’s work is designed to help people around the globe work to protect our blue planet. He is also an avid surfer and works hard to catch a wave wherever his travels take him.

Chelsea Rochman has her BS in Biology from UCSD and recently received her PhD in Marine Ecology from UC Davis and San Diego State in 2013. She is currently researching the fate and toxicity of plastic debris in freshwater and marine habitats. Specifically, her expertise is in the sorption of priority pollutants (pesticides, trace metals, flame retardants, and plastic additives) to plastic debris and from plastic debris in aquatic habitats and the fate and toxicity of this debris in marine organisms. In addition to researching plastic debris in coastal habitats, she has experience researching debris in the North Pacific Gyre and the South Atlantic Gyre as part of separate research cruises.

Ted Siegler has 40 years of experience working on solid waste management issues. He served for 15 years as Technical Consultant to the American Plastics Council on increasing the recovery of plastics for recycling, and has spent the past 20 years working on capacity building for local and central governments in 14 countries around the world. Ted specializes in recycling collection and processing, economic analysis, and municipal finance and has been with DSM Environmental Services, Inc. since 1987. DSM specializes in waste reduction and recycling issues for municipal and state governments.

480×270



value="AQ~~,AAAAAGWqYgE~,KxHPzbPALrGDV8e0pjstUOKGoH-E1SsL" />

This was our top tweet of the week and it’s no wonder why–finding out that over one third of a given sample of fish have plastic in their bellies is downright creepy. This study by Plymouth University and the UK Marine Biological Association illustrates the tangible effects that trash has on our ocean. If you’re looking for ways to lessen your impact and to keep the ocean healthy, try downloading our mobile app, Rippl. You’ll get weekly ocean-friendly tips and be able to track your progress!

2. Welcome to the Plastic Beach

While this isn’t nearly as enjoyable as the Gorillaz song “Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach,” news about the amount of plastic at Kamilo Point in Hawaii certainly gave it a realistic perspective in the Twittersphere this week. Our expert Nick Mallos reported that the so-called “Junk Beach” was the most plastic-laden one he’s ever seen–and that’s after 240,000 lbs. of microplastics have been removed by the Hawaii Wildlife Fund since 2003.

3. Skip the Landfill–Donate Instead!

Our five suggestions for donating those random things hanging around your home that you’ll never use resonated well with our followers, ranking third on our top tweets list this week. Another helpful addition (courtesy of one of our Facebook friends): donate your time!

4. Forget About Last Year’s Tsunami? The Ocean Hasn’t

Our field guide for tsunami debris tells you what the most common forms of debris are–and what you should do if and when you find it.

5. Colorful Corals–But Why?

This tweet got a lot of attention largely because it asks a question we’ve all probably wondered at one point or another, but never really knew the answer. In this case, there’s more to beauty than meets the eye!

As always, we’ll be tweeting on a daily basis from @OurOcean, so make sure to follow us for all the latest ocean news, Ocean Conservancy blog posts, fun trivia and more!

]]> http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2013/01/26/this-weeks-top-tweets-january-19-25/feed/ 0 A New Website for Ocean Conservancy is Here http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/11/06/a-new-website-for-ocean-conservancy-is-here/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/11/06/a-new-website-for-ocean-conservancy-is-here/#comments Tue, 06 Nov 2012 15:36:59 +0000 Guest Blogger http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=3451

As I look back at the run Ocean Conservancy has had in the digital space over the last several months, I can’t help but be proud and humbled:

Proud of the work we’ve done to create some fantastic products and campaigns to get our supporters more involved in the fight for a clean and healthy ocean. And humbled by the immensely talented and driven individuals I’m privileged to work and create with every day.

Over these months, we’ve worked with staff across Ocean Conservancy’s program areas to:

And now, we’re building on that success, by launching a completely redesigned website for Ocean Conservancy.

We hope this new site will be an engaging and immersive experience for our community and will make it easier for you to find information on our vision for a healthy ocean and how we’re working to achieve that vision.

We also believe this new site will give you more opportunities to engage with us, whether it’s signing up for our updates and action alerts, connecting with us through social media, or leaving your thoughts on a feature story.

The site design, and it’s features, are a recognition that Ocean Conservancy is only as strong as the community of supporters, activists and donors who support us. We need to hear from you and this new site is designed to facilitate the conversation.

In fact, as you go through the site, you will see a gray tab in the lower left-hand corner of every page. If you encounter any issues, or want to leave a message for us, you can do so through that tab. Anything submitted to that tab will go directly to me and you won’t be added to our email lists. We simply want to hear from you so we can make the site better.

Despite all of this work, we’re not finished — in fact, out work is just beginning. In the coming weeks, we’ll continue to improve our digital presence by:

  • Rolling out a fresh design for The Blog Aquatic,
  • Relaunching our ocean trash action site, Keep the Coast Clear, and
  • Creating a mobile version of our website to give you the absolute best on-the-go experience we can.

As we roll out the new site and these future improvements, I want to thank everyone at Ocean Conservancy — from our program staff, to our finance and development teams and, of course, my colleagues in Marketing and Communications — who have all worked to make this site the best it can be.

I’d also like to recognize the work of Brodeur Partners and Digital Pulp, who worked tirelessly as true partners over the last year to help create the content and the design you see on the site.

And of course, we want to thank you, our supporters, for making all of this possible and fighting every day for a healthy ocean.

If you have questions about the new site, or what we’re up to online, please leave a comment. I’m happy to let you all know what’s going on.

]]>
http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/11/06/a-new-website-for-ocean-conservancy-is-here/feed/ 0
Plight of Albatross Inspires Scientist to Clean Up Beaches http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/10/10/plight-of-albatross-inspires-scientist-to-clean-up-beaches/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/10/10/plight-of-albatross-inspires-scientist-to-clean-up-beaches/#comments Wed, 10 Oct 2012 20:09:59 +0000 Sarah van Schagen http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=2185 Albatross on Midway Atoll

Credit: Nick Mallos

How do scientists choose their life’s work? For avid surfer Nick Mallos, a love of the ocean made marine biology an easy choice. But it was a black-and-white bird with a 6-foot wingspan that inspired him to focus his research on marine debris and clean up as many beaches as he can.

Nick first encountered the Laysan albatross during a grad school research trip to Midway Atoll in the North Pacific. With over 450,000 nesting pairs, Midway Atoll is home to the largest Laysan population in the world. The birds cover the 2.4 square-mile area, nesting in every available nook, from abandoned WWII gun turrets to grassy cracks in the pavement.

But once you look beyond those birds, “you realize there’s this scattering of plastic over the entire island,” Nick says. “It’s impossible to not see plastic – it’s just everywhere. The most perverse part of it is that it’s most heavily concentrated around every nest.”

Plastic fragments in a dead albatross skeleton

Credit: Nick Mallos

That’s because most of the plastic on the island arrives in the gullets of the adult albatross who accidentally ingest it while fishing at sea. Then they regurgitate that food-and-plastic mixture when feeding their chicks. Scientists estimate that some 4.5 metric tons of plastic arrive on the island every year in the stomachs of the albatross.

“It’s just very surreal being in this beautiful environment where the waters are as turquoise blue as you can imagine and the beaches are pure white, and then you see this array of unnatural color across the island, which is all plastics,” Mallos says.

The inner core of the island is littered with small, fragmented plastics like bottle caps, toothbrushes and cigarette lighters – all carried there by the birds.

“I was 1,200 miles from Oahu, the nearest urban center, and there were consumer products everywhere,” Mallos says. “I could have outfitted an entire bathroom cabinet with what I saw there.”

That realization really got him thinking about the full scale of the ocean trash issue. Six months later, he joined Ocean Conservancy as a marine debris specialist and has since worked to better understand how trash affects our ocean and how we can prevent it from reaching our beaches in the first place.

What motivates you to participate in beach cleanups?

]]> http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/10/10/plight-of-albatross-inspires-scientist-to-clean-up-beaches/feed/ 13