The Blog Aquatic » national oceanic and atmospheric administration http://blog.oceanconservancy.org News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy Thu, 28 Aug 2014 17:32:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Nothing (Still) Beats an Astronaut and Oceanographer for Next NOAA Chief http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2013/09/18/nothing-still-beats-an-astronaut-and-oceanographer-for-next-noaa-chief/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2013/09/18/nothing-still-beats-an-astronaut-and-oceanographer-for-next-noaa-chief/#comments Wed, 18 Sep 2013 20:18:32 +0000 Jeff Watters http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=6671

Kathryn Sullivan, President Obama’s nominee to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

 

Sullivan’s nomination is on the move! The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation – the committee that has jurisdiction over the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – is holding a hearing tomorrow on Kathryn Sullivan’s nomination to be the agency’s head. This is an important step towards Congressional approval of Sullivan’s nomination. NOAA is our nation’s lead ocean agency, and we hope that Congress moves swiftly to confirm Dr. Sullivan for this important post.

Learn more about the hearing here.

 

Excerpt from the original post:

The first American woman to walk in space. An oceanographer and acting NOAA administrator. Former president and CEO of Ohio’s Center of Science and Industry. These are just some of the highlights in the career of Kathryn Sullivan, President Obama’s nominee to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Needless to say, she has some serious science cred.

This is great news for NOAA and all those who care about a healthy ocean. If confirmed, the agency will have strong leadership from someone who already has a good sense of the agency, its mission and its challenges.

With Sullivan’s background in both the ocean and satellites—which represent both NOAA’s “wet” and “dry” sides—she will provide the guidance needed to make the right decisions.

Click here to read the rest of the original post.

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Nothing Beats an Astronaut and Oceanographer for Next NOAA Chief http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2013/08/06/nothing-beats-an-astronaut-and-oceanographer-for-next-noaa-chief/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2013/08/06/nothing-beats-an-astronaut-and-oceanographer-for-next-noaa-chief/#comments Tue, 06 Aug 2013 21:00:01 +0000 Emily Woglom http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=6480

Kathryn Sullivan, President Obama’s nominee to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The first American woman to walk in space. An oceanographer and acting NOAA administrator. Former president and CEO of Ohio’s Center of Science and Industry. These are just some of the highlights in the career of Kathryn Sullivan, President Obama’s nominee to head the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Needless to say, she has some serious science cred.

This is great news for NOAA and all those who care about a healthy ocean. If confirmed, the agency will have strong leadership from someone who already has a good sense of the agency, its mission and its challenges.

With Sullivan’s background in both the ocean and satellites—which represent both NOAA’s “wet” and “dry” sides—she will provide the guidance needed to make the right decisions.

When it comes to funding and resources, at times these dual missions are pitted against each other. As I’ve previously written, Congress must maintain balanced investments across NOAA’s missions. Americans shouldn’t have to choose between weather satellites and ocean and coastal resources that support and protect our coastal economies and communities. NOAA’s “wet side” programs contribute to disaster preparedness and mitigation, and support severe storm tracking and weather forecasting systems.

With Sullivan’s background, we expect her to understand the importance of supporting both sides, while finding the right balance across NOAA’s missions.

Perhaps the biggest challenge Sullivan faces may be working in today’s political climate. Some lawmakers in Congress don’t have the best track record when it comes to supporting our ocean. Whether it’s working on fisheries, climate or satellites, these tasks take courage. This job won’t be easy, but who better to take that on than a woman who has already proven to be a pioneer?

We look forward to hearing more from Sullivan and urge Congress to swiftly approve her nomination. We need smart, savvy and tough leaders defending our ocean right now, and Sullivan is the right pick for the job.

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Trash Talk on Capitol Hill http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/12/17/trash-talk-on-capitol-hill/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2012/12/17/trash-talk-on-capitol-hill/#comments Mon, 17 Dec 2012 14:38:32 +0000 Ellen Bolen http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=3893

That’s not an oil slick — it’s debris from last year’s Japanese tsunami that washed into the ocean. Credit: U.S. Pacific Fleet flickr stream

There’s plenty of trash talk on Capitol Hill these days – but probably not the kind you are thinking about. It’s not talk about the fiscal cliff or the elections, it’s all the recent talk on the Hill about ocean trash. Recently we heard that the government of Japan gave the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration $5 million to address the ongoing problem of marine debris that resulted from the 2011 tsunami, the President’s disaster request for Superstorm Sandy included a request for funds to assess marine debris and, perhaps the trashiest conversation of all, the House and Senate passed the Marine Debris Reauthorization Act.

Last Wednesday night, after months of hard work by staff in both chambers – and on both sides of the aisle – the Senate passed the Marine Debris Reauthorization Act as part of the Coast Guard Reauthorization bill.  The House passed the bill last week.  Perhaps you are wondering what reauthorization even means. (I’m not sure schoolhouse Rock covered this portion of lawmaking.)

The reauthorized marine debris act included new language on severe marine debris events like the tsunami and Superstorm Sandy. The law now requires the Administrator of NOAA to develop interagency plans on how to respond to a severe marine debris event.  The plans will cover how to coordinate across agencies, how NOAA will assess and track marine debris from the event and how to estimate potential impacts from marine debris. This ensures NOAA will be even more prepared to deal with the next wave of ocean trash.

It’s important to remember these uncontrollable events – like Hurricane Sandy and the Japan tsunami – add to the larger issue of marine debris.  That’s why it’s important to tackle what’s preventable, because our ocean needs to be healthy and resilient when the unthinkable disasters take place.

The passage of the Marine Debris Reauthorization Act would not have been possible without the leadership and hard work of many members of Congress. Thank you to Sen. Inouye who introduced the bill in the Senate along with a group of 10 bipartisan cosponsors and Reps Don Young and Sam Farr who led the charge in the House with 40 cosponsors! While it seems like an odd thing to say in this town, thank you for talking trash.

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