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The Blog Aquatic

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

Aloha, Plastics: Ocean Trash Adventures in Hawaii

Posted On January 15, 2013 by

Neither tsunami debris nor marine debris is going away any time soon. Following an August 2012 NGO tsunami meeting and increasing reports of tsunami debris on the U.S. West Coast and Hawaii, concern and interest about tsunami debris in Japan continues to increase. Responding to this interest, the Environmental Restoration and Conservation Agency of Japan has funded a series of beach site investigations in the United States to convey the present situation of both tsunami and marine debris to Japan officials and the Japanese people. The first stop for these surveys:  Hawaii.

I teamed up with members from Japan Environmental Action Network (JEAN), the Oceanic Wildlife Society and the Japan Ministry of Environment tobegin surveys on O’ahu beaches where confirmed and suspected tsunami debris has recently been found . During our first inspection at Hanauma Bay, we examined a rusted Japanese refrigerator that washed ashore on December 20th, 2012, several days before a second fridge was found on Waimanalo Beach. Cleanup volunteers commonly found refrigerator pieces on Kaua’i beaches during this past summer.

Dr. Nikolai Maximenko of the University of Hawaii International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) explained that these different ‘waves’ of alike debris (e.g., oyster buoys, refrigerators, etc.) are a result of how tsunami debris is affected by wind. Because the tsunami debris entered the ocean at the same time, similar items travel at the same speed and will appear on Hawaiian and West Coast beaches around the same time.

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Surfers Find a Way and So Will Japan

Posted On June 1, 2012 by

Surfers cross a debris-laden barrier island at Gamo Beach, Japan. Credit: Nick Mallos

A good wave is always worth the sacrifice. It’s a unanimous sentiment shared by surfers around the world. For surfers at Gamo Beach, Japan, though, it’s not pounding surf that yields a challenge.

Instead, a 200-meter-wide body of water requires them to paddle out to a barrier island, only to traverse another 100 meters of beach where remnants of houses, car parts, bottles and innumerable other tsunami debris items litter the sand. Still, they reach the waves.

Walls of water 10 feet tall formed this island, left this debris and destroyed—or at least severely damaged—everything in its path as it moved inland. Debris piles five stories tall are the only elevation visible on the coastal horizon.

The cleanup effort here is much further along than in the Tohoku region, but progress is relative considering the magnitude of destruction. I joined forces with 11 members of Cleanup Gamo and Jean Environmental Action Network to address this remaining debris in the best way we knew how: a beach cleanup.

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With sincere thanks: Guest post from JEAN

Posted On May 14, 2012 by

Credit: Izzy Schwartz

This is a guest post from Japan Environmental Action Network.

No matter where we live, we are united in our effort to leave a beautiful ocean for future generations. And with your support, we know this to be true now more than ever.

To all those who gave, thank you. We are so grateful for your donations to help JEAN continue working with the issue of marine debris in Japan.

Last year, Japan faced such a devastating disaster with the earthquake followed by the tsunami. Helping hands were lent from all over the world with encouragements and prayers. Together with site captains and volunteers who carry out or participate in the International Coastal Cleanup held through out Japan, we kept feeling sympathy for the rehabilitation and restoration of the affected areas. During this time, we carried out actions of support in the way each of us are able to. At the same time, we’ve been able to continue having the Cleanup as we have been doing in years past.

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