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News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

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6 Reasons to LOVE Arctic Important Marine Areas

Posted On October 29, 2016 by

This was originally posted as part of the Vital Arctic Ocean Areas blog series. See all posts here

This summer we were fortunate to share a blog series brought to us by Arctic scientists — experts working to study and understand the habitat, species and ecological changes happening at the top of the world. It’s rare for those of us who live a ways away to see a glimpse of this vibrant, and beautiful place, but our blog series aimed to bring YOU into the Arctic Ocean. We shared scientist stories about how truly special this place is. And how important the Arctic is, not only to the animals and people that thrive there, but to the overall health of our ocean. If you missed reading the blogs, we encourage you to check them out now. Here are just a few of the reasons we think you’ll enjoy reading the series.

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Appreciation: Writer Jean Craighead George Shared Her Love of Wild Places, Including the Arctic

Posted On August 20, 2012 by

Writer Jean Craighead George immersed herself in nature. Photo courtesy of Wendell Minor.

Enthralling descriptive writing that brings wild places and creatures to life is one of the things that moves us to save them. It’s what’s made writers from Thoreau to Rachel Carson to E.O. Wilson so inspiring. As a 12-year-old growing up on a Virginia farm, I found that very inspiration in the writing of Jean Craighead George.

George, who passed away recently at the age of 92, has been called one of America’s greatest nature writers for children.  Her novel “Julie of the Wolves” let me see the Arctic through the eyes of a young girl lost in the frozen landscape who survives by joining a family of wolves.

The image of Julie and her wolf pack often comes to me as I contemplate how we can save the incredible place they called home. Recently, I opened this wondrous book yet again. It had helped spark my early fascination with wild things—and with the Arctic. George forged a connection for me with a place I’ve never been, a connection that has remained vivid for decades.

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