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Ocean Currents

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

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5 Stand Out Ocean Dads

Posted On June 16, 2016 by

It’s the time of the year when we celebrate all the fantastic father figures around the world. Although most of the animal kingdom isn’t known for its exceptional parenting, (male grizzly bears will attack their own cubs? Ouch) there are a few notable exceptions. This Father’s Day, we’re celebrating some of the stand out dads throughout the ocean.

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10 Things to Know About Sea Turtles

Posted On June 16, 2016 by

This blog was written by Roger Di Silvestro, a field correspondent for Ocean Conservancy.

Sea turtles are among the world’s most ancient vertebrates. When on land, they look cumbersome and awkward, their powerful front flippers struggling to pull their weight across ocean shores. But in the water, where they spend most of their lives, sea turtles fly through the water much as birds soar through the sky. Their flippers become wings, their disk-shaped bodies cut through the sea like torpedoes.

Sea turtles remain one of nature’s great mysteries—scientists have only begun to discover secrets of sea turtle life. Here are ten things science can tell you about these marine animals.

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How Ocean Acidification Impacts Florida’s Ecosystems

Posted On June 15, 2016 by

Reef-building corals find refuge from climate change in mangrove habitats. Photo credit: Caroline Rogers, USGS.

Dr. Kimberly Yates will be a panelist at an ocean acidification roundtable we are hosting in Miami this week. There, she will join other scientists, Florida elected officials and local businesspeople in discussing what ocean acidification has in store for Florida’s marine life and its coastal communities. Follow the meeting on Twitter via #FL_OA on Friday, June 17!

OC: Your research focuses on several marine habitats in Florida: coral reefs, estuaries and mangroves. How are they coping with ocean acidification?

Dr. Yates: Most of what we know about how ocean acidification is affecting these environments comes from experimental research. We know some marine organisms will be negatively impacted, and some may benefit. For example, some species that form their skeletons and shells from minerals made of calcium carbonate, like corals and some shellfish, are negatively impacted. Ocean acidification slows the rate at which they grow their skeletons and shells, and can also cause calcium carbonate minerals to dissolve.

Other species like seagrasses and some marine algae benefit from ocean acidification because it increases their growth rates. Coral reefs have been degrading rapidly over the past few decades, and recent research shows that some reefs in the Florida Keys are beginning to dissolve during certain times of the year from ocean acidification…which was not expected to happen for another few decades. Estuaries and mangrove wetlands support many species of shellfish, and ocean acidification may negatively impact those species and the economies that depend on shell fisheries. We are still learning about how changes caused by ocean acidification are impacting these habitats.

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Sharing Stories on Twitter for #WorldOceansDay

Posted On June 11, 2016 by

Yesterday, marine enthusiasts from around the world came together to share why they love the ocean and what they’re doing to protect it. The Twitter chat, hosted by Ocean Conservancy, was in honor of World Oceans Day and featured our own Chief Scientist, George Leonard. Topics ranged from the most pressing issue facing our ocean to the most underappreciated ocean animal, with scores of good stories and photos in between.

If you missed it, not to fear. See some of the responses below and keep the conversation going with #OCchat!

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What Inspires a Spear Fisherman to go to Capitol Hill?

Posted On June 10, 2016 by

Captain Scott Childress owns and navigates a commercial spear fishing vessel located in Hudson, Florida.

When Ocean Conservancy asked me to join them to visit elected officials on Capitol Hill to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Magnuson Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA), I was quick to say a resounding “yes,” but a little nervous about my new role.

What the heck would I—a commercial spear fisherman—say to congressmen? As it turned out, quite a lot. I have a unique perspective on fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and on the U.S. law that has served as “tough love” for America’s fisheries.

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Leaving the Arctic

Posted On June 9, 2016 by

The news from the Arctic this week has been all about what’s leaving the Arctic. It’s good news when oil and gas companies leave the Arctic, but it’s really bad news when sea ice leaves the Arctic!!

First, let’s get to the good news. Repsol, an oil and gas company, just announced it’s abandoning 55 of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea and plans to abandon the remaining 38 over the next year. In addition, ConocoPhillips, Eni, Iona Energy and Shell have given up more than 350 leases covering more than 2 million acres in the Chukchi Sea. Soon, there will be only one lease remaining in the Chukchi Sea—and additional drilling on that lease is unlikely.

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Six Simple Ways to Make Your Outdoor Adventure Ocean-friendly

Posted On June 9, 2016 by

Summer is here and we are all eager to get outside. The beach is calling your name. Coasts all over the world are home to some of the best vacation spots, so get outdoors and have some fun! When you’re out on the water or relaxing on the beach, here are some tips and activities you can do to help keep the ocean a healthy place for humans to enjoy and a safe habitat for marine wildlife.

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