The Blog Aquatic

Donate Today

The Blog Aquatic

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

13
Comments

Coast Guard Report Shows Shell Failed to Recognize Risk in the Arctic

Posted On April 4, 2014 by

Photo: Coast Guard

This past Thursday, the U.S. Coast Guard released a report on its investigation into the grounding of Shell’s Arctic drilling rig Kulluk near Kodiak, Alaska on December 31, 2012. A tug lost control of the Kulluk in heavy weather on the way to Seattle after Shell’s failed attempt to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean in 2012.

The Coast Guard report provides a detailed account of the events before the Kulluk ran aground and identifies a number of causal factors, including lack of experience in Alaska waters, failure to recognize risks, use of inadequate equipment, insufficient planning and preparedness and major problems with the primary towing vessel.

Continue reading »

Presenting Our New Solutions at the Camden Conference

Posted On March 20, 2014 by

Last month, I was invited to speak at the Camden Conference in Maine. This conference brings experts from a number of disciplines together with policymakers, industry leaders and college students to discuss some of the biggest issues facing our world today. This year’s theme was “The Global Politics of Food and Water,” and I spoke about how the ocean sits at the nexus of these issues.

Right now, the ocean is in a period of uncertainty. Climate change and a growing population are changing the chemistry of the ocean and the life that calls it home. But instead of viewing the ocean’s changes in a negative light, I think we have an incredible opportunity to become better problem-solvers. We can break free from old resource management models to find new solutions for our changing ocean. We can effectively address these new complexities; it’s not too late.

Continue reading »

A Crowded Ocean Needs a Coordinated Plan

Posted On March 7, 2014 by

Photo: Nick Harris via Wikimedia Commons

Recently, we wrote about how Congress’ 2014 budget compromise eliminated grant funding for Regional Ocean Partnerships. Following the release of the president’s budget earlier this week, we thought we’d revisit the issue of ocean-use planning and discuss why Congress should reinstate funding.

Everyone knows the ocean is a big place, but it sure is getting crowded these days. Commercial and recreational fishermen who have lived off the sea for generations are now competing with offshore wind farms that are getting so large they can be seen from space. Whales that have made a comeback from near extinction are once again threatened by increasing deadly interactions with large ships that cross into the whales’ migratory paths. If we aren’t careful, there will be a traffic jam off our coasts and a lot of unnecessary conflict.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

Q&A with Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy’s New Science Outreach Manager

Posted On February 8, 2014 by

Sarah Cooley, Ph.D. joined Ocean Conservancy as a Science Outreach Manager in the Ocean Acidification program in January. Previously, she was a research scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Why did you become a scientist?

I always really liked science, and most of it just made sense to me. In college, I started feeling like there was always one more interesting science class over the horizon, so I decided to major in chemistry. Four years later, I still wanted to know more, but I wasn’t ready to face the real world, so I went to graduate school. I studied marine chemistry because I love the ocean and there seemed to be plenty of discoveries left to be made in that field.

Continue reading »

Ocean Conservancy Welcomes Eileen Sobeck to NOAA Fisheries

Posted On January 16, 2014 by

Granite Point, Point Lobos, California

© Feo Pitcairn

Yesterday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) named Eileen Sobeck as the new assistant administrator for NOAA Fisheries, better known as the National Marine Fisheries Service. As assistant administrator, she will oversee the management and conservation of all marine life within the U.S. exclusive economic zone, from coastal habitat to bluefin tuna and everything in between. Given the breadth of her job, it’s a good thing that Ms. Sobeck is no stranger to NOAA or ocean issues. She worked in the NOAA Office of the General Counsel from 1979 to 1984, and she currently serves as the acting assistant secretary of the Department of the Interior’s Office of Insular Affairs.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

New Offshore Renewable Energy Technology Highlights Need for Smart Ocean Planning

Posted On December 26, 2013 by

The VolturnUS floating wind turbine off the coast of Castine, Maine.

It was a blustery Maine day when I hiked out to a rocky promontory through the snow to get a glimpse of the University of Maine’s VolturnUS wind turbine in action. Ironically, I had seen the launch of this experimental turbine onto a barge in the Penobscot River on one of the hottest days of the summer – with much ceremony celebrating the first floating platform wind turbine to be tested in U.S. waters.

Today’s visit took me far upriver to the current testing site at Maine Maritime Academy (MMA) in Castine.

Guiding me to the viewing spot was Rick Armstrong, director of the Tidal Energy Device Evaluation Center, otherwise known as TEDEC. Had our weather been a bit more favorable, we would have taken one of MMA’s boats out to get an up-close look at the turbine as well another of their sites: a platform for testing tidal energy devices in the Bagaduce River.
Continue reading »

3
Comments

Challenges of a Changing Ocean: Can Congress Act in Time?

Posted On December 4, 2013 by

Credit: NOAA


The piece below was excerpted from an article by Tom Allen in Roll Call. Allen is the president and CEO of the Association of American Publishers and a Board member of Ocean Conservancy. He represented Maine’s 1st District in Congress for six terms and was a founding member of the House Oceans Caucus.


 

In a Congress marred by gridlock and partisan brinkmanship, a surprising opportunity has emerged to strengthen our nation’s ocean and coastal communities, businesses and environment. Congress should seize the moment and establish the long-recommended National Endowment for the Oceans, Coasts and Great Lakes.

Unless Congress acts now, the opportunity will slip away.

The House and Senate Water Resource Development Act (WRDA) bills currently in conference contain competing provisions — with competing visions — for the future of ocean and coastal management in America. This legislative conflict is part of our country’s broader ideological struggle, but with this difference: On the ocean, no state government, chamber of commerce or environmental group can exercise coordinated and effective leadership alone.

Continue reading »