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News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

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Shell Spills 88,000 Gallons of Oil in Gulf

Posted On May 13, 2016 by

Today, the Coast Guard reported that Shell’s Brutus oil platform, about 90 miles off the coast of Louisiana, has spilled more than 80,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a bad week for Shell—just Monday, Shell gave up most of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea off the coast of Alaska. Although it is too early to know the extent of environmental damage from the Shell spill, we do know that the Gulf of Mexico is still damaged from the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster six years ago.

Thankfully, the leak has been secured, and clean-up efforts are underway, as a result of NOAA and the Coast Guard’s immediate response. There are 52,000 boreholes drilled into the Gulfseafloor, the result of a century-old search for oil and gas. Much of the time, offshore oil production proceeds relatively safely and without much public interest, but when things go wrong in the Gulf of Mexico, they can really go wrong.

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Microplastics in Paradise

Posted On May 12, 2016 by

At first glance, the waters of St. John, USVI, are pristine: Rich blues and greens mix in a postcard-ready Caribbean vista while schools of tropical fish dart just below the surface.

But beneath the shimmering turquoise waters lurks a hidden peril: microplastics.

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Icy Waters for Shell

Posted On May 10, 2016 by

Yesterday, Shell gave up almost all of its oil and gas leases in the Chukchi Sea. This marks another nail in the coffin for risky offshore oil drilling in the Arctic.

But Shell still has one lease remaining in the Chukchi Sea, along with leases in the Beaufort Sea off northern Alaska. What’s more, the Obama Administration is still considering whether to allow the sale of more offshore oil leases in Arctic waters.

There is too much at stake to risk additional leasing. Will you join us in protecting our Arctic by taking action today?

Some of the world’s largest seabird populations congregate in the Arctic. Iconic wildlife thrives in this amazing ecosystem, including polar bears, beluga whales and ringed seals.

Please take action by asking the Obama Administration to drop Arctic leasing from the final version of the 2017 to 2022 leasing program.

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Update: Forage Fish Protection Begins on the West Coast

Posted On May 4, 2016 by

I have another fin-tastic update for you, from the West Coast!

If you recall, about five weeks ago I wrote in gratitude over the outpouring of support from Ocean Conservancy activists, who together with other conservation supporters sent nearly 100,000 letters to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) asking them to finalize protection for West Coast forage fish.

We said we’d get back to you on the final outcome and I’m happy to tell you about this victory! As of today, the final rule is complete and these fish will now be protected, and their immense importance to a range of predators from rockfish to whales to seabirds sustained.

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Taking on Plastic at the Met Gala

Posted On May 3, 2016 by

Photo: Emma Watson/Facebook

True confessions: I’m secretly a total Harry Potter nerd. Okay, maybe it’s not so secret… (#TeamHufflepuff anyone?) Which is why I did a literal happy dance in my living room when I saw Emma Watson’s gown for last night’s Met Gala.

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Photos: Life in the Arctic

Posted On April 27, 2016 by

My name is Sarah Bobbe and I am Ocean Conservancy’s Arctic Program Specialist based in Anchorage, Alaska. TIn case you missed it, this week I took over the Ocean Conservancy Instagram account, and wanted to post the images here! I am thrilled that I have the opportunity to share my passion for the Arctic and the conservation of this region with you all.

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10 Things to Know about Penguins

Posted On April 25, 2016 by

Adelie penguin

This blog was written by Roger Di Silvestro, a field correspondent for Ocean Conservancy.

The tuxedo seems to have two separate origins. Why the fashion industry came up with the tux, and why it hasn’t vanished with the top hat, is tough to say. But why penguins evolved into tuxedo-wearing birds is pretty clear: The white belly makes them harder to spot when viewed in water from below against the surface of a sunlit sea, and the black back does the same against the dark ocean surface. It’s all about tricking predators. The survival of this monochromatic color scheme in all 17 penguin species is a measure of how well it has worked in nature’s often-unforgiving game of survival.

Here are ten other fun facts to know about penguins.

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