Ocean Currents

Donate Today

Ocean Currents

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy


The Conditions are Right for Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

Posted On October 9, 2015 by

A successful fishing trip depends on more than just the number of fish in the sea. It is dependent upon a multitude of complicating factors including the weather conditions, your ability to catch fish and even lack of engine problems to name a few.

Like a fishing trip, sustainable management of our fisheries requires more than just counting the number of fish in the sea. A sustainable catch level requires an understanding of the environment they live in. Fish need suitable habitat to live, other fish to eat, and will eventually become prey for bigger fish, including humans. Furthermore, fish live in a dynamic, changing ocean. When fisheries managers consider these ‘complicating’ factors in the setting of sustainable catch levels, the process is called ecosystem-based fisheries management.

Continue reading »

Can We Turn Trash Into Treasure?

Posted On October 9, 2015 by

Smart Solutions Are Smart Business

An estimated 8 million metric tonnes of plastic enters our ocean every year, and that figure is predicted to double in the next ten years if something isn’t done. A problem this large can’t be solved by one government, one company or one organization – it requires an all-hands-on-deck approach.

Last week, Ocean Conservancy released a ground-breaking study: Stemming the Tide: Land-based strategies for a plastic-free ocean. The report outlines a specific path forward for the reduction, and ultimate elimination, of plastic waste in the ocean. The report is a signature initiative of the Trash Free Seas Alliance®, an effort of Ocean Conservancy to unite industry, science and conservation leaders who share a common goal for a healthy ocean free of trash.

Continue reading »

Parlez vous oysters?

Posted On October 6, 2015 by

© YLM Picture

“Although each of the world’s countries would like to dispute this fact, we French know the truth: the best food in the world is made in France. The best food in France is made in Paris.” That is how “Ratatouille,” one of my favorite movies, begins. Now I don’t want to pick a fight over what city has the best food, but I think we can all agree that Paris has made a name for itself as a food destination and taste exporter. This December, Paris might become world-renowned for exporting something else that has a big impact on food: a global carbon pollution agreement.

Continue reading »

Recycling: Bali Style

Posted On October 6, 2015 by

We have a clear choice when it comes to plastic in our ocean. If we do nothing, plastic production will double in the next 10 years, and so will the amount that enters our ocean. If we act now, we can cut the amount of plastic entering our ocean by nearly half. The solution is clear: implementing waste management infrastructure in countries where the economic growth is outpacing the ability to manage waste.

As we researched our new report, Stemming the Tide: Land-based strategies for a plastic-free ocean, we stopped in Indonesia and met with Olivier Pouillon, Founder of The Bali Recycling Company to talk about his insights about waste management and recycling in the region.

Below is a Q&A between Emily Woglom, Vice President, Conservation Policy and Programs and Olivier Pouillon, Founder of The Bali Recycling Company.

Q: What inspired your passion for recycling and waste issues?

A: I first got into this work back in 1991 when I was in school in Indonesia. I had to do an independent report and I was trying to figure out what topic to focus on. Waste was becoming a big issue here because plastic bottles were just starting to come into Bali and there was pretty much zero waste service.

Continue reading »

How One City in the Philippines is Setting an Example for the World

Posted On October 5, 2015 by

As much as eight million metric tonnes of plastic leak into the world’s ocean every year and the amounts continue to grow. Without concerted global action, there could be one ton of plastic for every three tons of fish by 2025, leading to massive environmental, economic and health issues. One city in the Philippines isn’t standing by and waiting for help. They’re taking action.

Below is a Q&A between Emily Woglom, Ocean Conservancy’s Vice President of Conservation Policy and Programs and Belen Fernandez, Mayor of the city of Dagupan, a coastal community in the Philippines.

Emily: To start off, for those who aren’t familiar with Dagupan, what would you tell people about the city and its people?

Belen: We’re a happy city and a happy people. More importantly, we’re resilient. We’re doing what we can to get wi-fi into our schools to help our students and also working to improve health care. As a city, we’re always looking to improve the quality of life in our city and our families. One of the biggest challenges I’ve had as mayor – as it relates to improving the quality of life for our people – is our waste problem.

Continue reading »


Victory in the Arctic: Shell Terminates Drilling Activities in the Chukchi Sea

Posted On September 28, 2015 by

Early on Monday morning, Shell announced that it would no longer pursue oil-drilling activities in the Chukchi Sea off the northwest coast of Alaska. Shell’s announcement has been a long time coming, and marks a major victory for all those who have opposed Arctic drilling as too risky and too much of a threat to the Arctic ecosystem and the planet’s climate.

Shell purchased its Chukchi Sea leases in 2008, but was precluded from drilling on its leases for many years. Among other things, legal challenges exposed flaws in the government’s environmental analyses and the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster resulted in a temporary restriction on Arctic drilling. In 2012, Shell finally received the green light to drill in the Chukchi Sea, but the company was woefully unprepared for the challenge: vessels were not ready, spill response equipment failed under testing, equipment spewed air pollution in violation of standards and one of its drill rigs was swept ashore in a storm on the way back to Seattle. In the end, Shell failed to complete a single well in 2012.

Continue reading »


Another Brick in the Wall: Plastics in the Seafood We Eat

Posted On September 24, 2015 by

Marine debris litters a beach on Laysan Island in the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge, where it washed ashore.

Photo: Susan White / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

If you have been reading my recent posts, you have noticed that I have been discussing the emerging science on plastic pollution in the ocean and exploring what we need to do to stem the tide. It started in February, when a groundbreaking study showed that 8 million tons (nearly 17 billion pounds) of plastic flows into the ocean each year, mostly from a small number of Asian nations where local waste management can’t keep up with rapidly growing plastic use. Then scientists estimated that nearly all the worlds’ seabirds will be contaminated by plastics by 2050 unless conditions don’t change.  And a study published only days later showed that half the globe’s sea turtles are likely to suffer the same fate. Today, we need to think carefully about the latest study, showing that plastics can be found in many of the fish that we eat. We don’t yet know if eating plastic-laden fish negatively impacts our health, but today’s study is another brick in the growing wall of scientific evidence that demonstrates that plastics are a major threat to the global ocean and ultimately, ourselves.

Continue reading »