Ocean Currents

Donate Today

Ocean Currents

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

//

An Ocean Perspective for a Planet at the Crossroads

Posted On September 7, 2016 by

A conversation between Ocean Conservancy’s CEO Andreas Merkl and Nainoa Thompson, president of the Polynesian Voyaging Society and navigator of the iconic Hōkūle‘a, as Hawaiʻi hosts the IUCN World Conservation Congress.

With a shared passion for our ocean, Merkl (@AndreasMerkl) and Thompson spoke about experiencing unparalleled beauty on the water, the plague of plastic pollution in our ocean and the importance of bringing people together to find solutions.

The Polynesian Voyaging Society and Ocean Conservancy will be part of an International Coastal Cleanup organized by the U.S. Department of State in James Campbell Wildlife Refuge on September 9, 2016. For over 30 years, Ocean Conservancy has rallied the world’s biggest single-day volunteer effort on behalf of the ocean through the International Coastal Cleanup. (Please click here if you’d like to sign-up to cleanup on September 17, 2016.)

The following was edited for clarity and length.

Continue reading »

2
Comments

5 Amazing Reasons to Love Papahānaumokuākea, Even More

Posted On September 1, 2016 by

Last week, we learned President Obama is creating the world’s largest marine protected area by expanding the Hawaiian national monument of Papahānaumokuākea! We’re excited. Seriously excited. In honor of that announcement, here are five reasons we love Papahānaumokuākea, and how its expansion just means more to love.

1. The name

While we (still) might be struggling with the pronunciation, the name Papahānaumokuākea holds rich cultural significance, meaning the union of two native ancestors in Hawaiian mythology. The name itself is a combination of the Earth Mother, Papahānaumoku, and the Sky Father, Wakea, who together created the islands and its people.

Say it with me, PAH-pa-ha-NOW-muh-kua-kay-yah.

(We’ll keep working on it)

Continue reading »

Cruising the Northwest Passage: A Symbol of a Rapidly Changing Arctic

Posted On August 17, 2016 by

Photo: Ocean Conservancy / Sarah Bobbe

SEWARD, ALASKA – Small only in comparison to the rocky peaks surrounding the city, the cruise ship Crystal Serenity easily dwarfed every other structure in Seward, Alaska. On August 16, she slipped her moorings and started a month-long voyage through the Northwest Passage with over 1,700 passengers and crew onboard. 

This is an important milestone to us. The impact of climate change has now ushered in an era where a luxury cruise ship is able to sail from the North Pacific to the Atlantic via the fabled Northwest Passage—a route that once defeated even the most intrepid explorers. While other vessels have made the transit, this is the first time a tour ship of this size—almost the length of three football fields—has attempted the passage. Crystal Serenity’s journey is yet another symbol of a rapidly changing Arctic.

Continue reading »

Exploring Icebergs in Our Nation’s Capital

Posted On August 6, 2016 by

When the heat index is well over 100 degrees, Washington, D.C. locals will do whatever it takes to stay cool. This summer, the National Building Museum is making it easier than ever to escape the heat—by bringing an icy environment straight to our backyard.

Their new exhibit, Icebergs, is a massive installation that allows visitors to immerse themselves in a polar ecosystem. Designed by James Corner Field Operations, the tallest iceberg stretches 56’ high to the third story of the museum and allows panoramic views from high above the “ocean” surface. The entire system is built from re-usable construction materials, such as scaffolding and polycarbonate paneling.

Continue reading »

11
Comments

World’s Best Ocean Athletes

Posted On August 2, 2016 by

All eyes are on Brazil this month, but you won’t find all of the world’s top athletes in Rio. Some of the fastest, strongest and flashiest athletes live under the water—and aren’t afraid to show off. From manta rays to blue whales, check out ocean athletes who could challenge the top Olympic gold medalists.

Continue reading »

14
Comments

Announcing the Winners of the 2016 Marine Wildlife and Seascape Photo Contest

Posted On August 1, 2016 by

This summer, we asked all of you to submit your best photos to our 2016 Marine Wildlife and Seascape Photo Contest. We were amazed by all of the beautiful images that you submitted and incredibly grateful for those of you who voted. After weeks of deliberation, our judges have spoken! Here are the winners from this year’s photo contest!

A hearty congratulations to Tracey Jennings and Daniela Hill for claiming the top two prizes!

“In the Blue,” the photo by Tracey Jennings, is a stunning shot of a whale shark in the waters of Indonesia. Judges loved the “simplicity of nature outlined by patterns and shapes”, and the use of light in the image, earning her the “Judges’ Choice” award.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

Mid-Atlantic Ocean Users Tell Congress to Support the New Ocean Action Plan

Posted On July 26, 2016 by

What do recreational fishermen, research scientists, commercial shipping representatives, conservationists and renewable energy developers have in common? They’ve all come together at a common table to address important decisions being made about our ocean thanks to ocean planning.

Two weeks ago, over 20 ocean users from the five Mid-Atlantic states came to Washington, D.C., to talk about the recently released Mid-Atlantic Ocean Action Plan with Members of Congress and the National Ocean Council at the White House.

These individuals came to D.C. with a simple message: the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Action Plan was released July 5th, and it will provide real benefits to our ocean, the states, and ocean industries. It offers a seat at the decision-making table for ocean users across the region and seeks to proactively identify ocean uses and resolve conflicts before they become problematic. They asked members of Congress to support the plan, and to support their respective industries’ roles in the planning process.

Continue reading »