The Blog Aquatic

Donate Today

The Blog Aquatic

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

3
Comments

Western Australia Shark Cull

Posted On February 13, 2014 by

Tiger shark photo: Matthew Potenski, 2011 photo contest

Many species of sharks and rays around the world are in trouble, and current events in Australia remind us of that. The government of Western Australia is presently implementing a controversial “shark cull” policy in response to recent highly publicized shark attacks near Western Australian beaches. The policy consists of deploying baited hooks about a mile off of various Western Australian beaches, aimed specifically at catching large sharks. Any shark larger than 10 feet is viewed as a threat to public safety and is to be “humanely” killed; the main targets of the cull are tiger sharks, bull sharks and great white sharks. Great white sharks are a protected species in Australia, and state authorities were given a special exemption from Australia’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act to be able to kill them. The shark cull is a pilot program. If it were to continue after the April 30 trial period ends, there would have to be a full environmental act assessment.

Continue reading »

You’re Our “Otter” Half

Posted On February 12, 2014 by

With Valentine’s Day only two days away, we’re thinking about all the people who are special in our lives. And that’s why we’re thinking of YOU. We couldn’t do our work to protect the ocean without your support. You’re our “otter” half.

Now it’s your turn. We’ve put together some Valentine’s Day ecards to help you share your love of the ocean with friends and family.

Click here to send your friends and family a Valentine’s Day ecard now.

Take a minute to remind someone that they’re important to you— it’ll brighten their day.

Continue reading »

It’s time to vote for your favorite photos

Posted On February 10, 2014 by

We’ve received some truly amazing photos from this year’s photo contest! Thank you to everyone who participated!

The photo submission period is officially over and now the fun begins. It’s time to vote for your favorites! It’s easy to do. Just go to our site, take a minute to check out all our entries and then cast your vote.

How does the voting work? Each vote is $1. So for every $1 donation you make, you’re helping to protect the fish, wildlife and ocean ecosystems you love!

Continue reading »

1
Comment

Q&A with Sarah Cooley, Ocean Conservancy’s New Science Outreach Manager

Posted On February 8, 2014 by

Sarah Cooley, Ph.D. joined Ocean Conservancy as a Science Outreach Manager in the Ocean Acidification program in January. Previously, she was a research scientist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Why did you become a scientist?

I always really liked science, and most of it just made sense to me. In college, I started feeling like there was always one more interesting science class over the horizon, so I decided to major in chemistry. Four years later, I still wanted to know more, but I wasn’t ready to face the real world, so I went to graduate school. I studied marine chemistry because I love the ocean and there seemed to be plenty of discoveries left to be made in that field.

Continue reading »

1
Comment

Shell CEO Says No Arctic Drilling in 2014

Posted On January 31, 2014 by

Photo: U.S. Coast Guard

On Jan. 30, Shell Oil announced that it has postponed plans to drill for oil in the Chukchi Sea off the northwest coast of Alaska in 2014. Shell’s decision followed a recent court decision that threw into question the status of Shell’s offshore oil leases in the Chukchi Sea—but other factors are at play, too.

As explained in my previous blog post, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled that an environmental analysis associated with the 2008 Chukchi Sea lease sale was faulty. Under the court’s decision, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management will have to revisit that environmental analysis, and then decide whether to affirm its 2008 decision to sell the offshore leases. In the wake of the court ruling, Shell’s new CEO announced that the company is “not prepared to commit further resources for drilling in Alaska in 2014.”

Continue reading »

35
Comments

Interview: Dr. Eric Hoffmayer on Tracking Whale Sharks in the Gulf of Mexico

Posted On January 30, 2014 by

Dr. Hoffmayer and a whale shark in the Gulf of Mexico. [Photo: Jim Franks]

(This blog is part of a series of interviews with scientists who are championing marine research in the Gulf of Mexico.)

A preeminent whale shark expert and ecophysiologist, Dr. Eric R. Hoffmayer is a research fishery biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service, Southeast Fisheries Science Center, Mississippi Laboratories. His interest in coastal shark species ranges from their reproduction and life history to their specific abundance, distribution and feeding ecology in nursery grounds. He has pursued a particular interest in the Gulf of Mexico’s whale sharks, the largest fish in the ocean, compiling information on their basic biology, habitat use and movement patterns.

Ocean Conservancy:  How much is known generally about the whale sharks found in the Gulf of Mexico? What is the size of the population?

Dr. Hoffmayer:  Ironically, even though whale sharks are the largest fish in the ocean, we still know so little about them, specifically here in the Gulf of Mexico. We know from our research efforts, as well as from research efforts of our colleagues in the southern Gulf, that whale sharks are relatively common in the Gulf. Unfortunately, due to their highly migratory nature and preference for offshore habitats, we still do not have a good population estimate for this region. However, colleagues working in the southern Gulf have estimated that between 500 and 900 individuals occur off the Yucatan Peninsula. In the northern Gulf, whale sharks occur along the continental shelf edge from Brownsville, Texas, to the Florida Keys and commonly occur off the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Continue reading »

2
Comments

Court Decision is a Step in the Right Direction for the Arctic Ocean

Posted On January 24, 2014 by

Large ice flows in the Arctic Ocean

Copyright Corbis. All rights reserved.

On Jan. 22, a panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion that will help ensure federal agencies and the public have a more complete picture of the risks and environmental impacts that could result from the sale of offshore oil and gas leases. The court’s decision also raises serious questions about the status of Arctic leases in the Chukchi Sea off the northwest coast of Alaska, and could make it difficult for companies like Shell Oil to drill for oil anytime soon.

The 9th Circuit ruled that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) did not follow legal requirements when the agency assessed the potential environmental impacts of a 2008 offshore oil and gas lease sale in the Chukchi Sea. Before deciding whether to sell offshore oil and gas leases, BOEM conducts an environmental analysis. Part of that analysis assesses the potential impact of oil and gas development that might result from the lease sale. In the case of the Chukchi Sea lease sale, BOEM’s analysis assumed the sale of the offshore leases would result in the production of a relatively low volume of oil. In fact, BOEM used the very lowest estimate that could possibly be expected.

Continue reading »