The Blog Aquatic » Sonya Besteiro http://blog.oceanconservancy.org News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy Mon, 18 Aug 2014 20:20:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.4.2 Keep Boating Practices Shipshape with Good Mate http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/03/20/keep-boating-practices-shipshape-with-good-mate/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/03/20/keep-boating-practices-shipshape-with-good-mate/#comments Thu, 20 Mar 2014 15:00:12 +0000 Sonya Besteiro http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=7869

As much of the country shakes off the cold of winter, newly budding trees, blooming flowers and balmy temperatures all signal spring’s imminent arrival. The warmer weather also means that boating season is right around the corner.

Just in time, Ocean Conservancy has released its updated Good Mate Manual for green boating. So, while you’re getting your vessel shipshape for its return to the water, take a moment to ensure that your boating practices are in good order as well.

Boaters and marinas are in unique positions to stop trash and other pollution from entering the water. The Good Mate program offers informative and useful tips to help these important user groups be leaders in water protection.

The Good Mate Manual covers six key areas related to boating: oil and fuel, sewage pollution, vessel maintenance and repair, marine debris, stormwater runoff, and vessel operation. And it offers simple, sensible steps that boaters and marina staff can take to develop best boating practices.

You don’t have to wait for the final spring thaw to start incorporating these environmentally friendly management strategies into your operations. Here are five easy ways boaters can protect our ocean and waterways, starting today:

1. Be a leader in your community.

Talk about marine litter prevention with members of your boating community, from your neighbor in the next slip to boating clubs and marina managers.

2. Offer your time.

Volunteer in boat and marina cleanup programs, especially at sites only accessible by boat. And participate in Ocean Conservancy’s annual International Coastal Cleanup, the largest volunteer effort of its kind for the ocean.

3. Be prepared for accidents.

Accidents happen. Be prepared with absorbent pads to clean oil or fuel spills. Dish soap doesn’t work. It just causes those liquids to sink and contaminate the bottom.

4. Take it all back to shore.

Don’t allow cigarette butts to go overboard; small but significant, they are the most prevalent marine litter item found during the International Coastal Cleanup. Dispose of them properly onshore.

5. Set the pace.

Recycle everything you can, from beverage containers to propeller-snarling fishing line or plastic bags.

For more in-depth information on how to practice green boating, visit www.oceanconservancy.org/goodmate.

 

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(Re)using the Same Old Lines http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/03/08/reusing-the-same-old-lines/ http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/2014/03/08/reusing-the-same-old-lines/#comments Sat, 08 Mar 2014 15:30:09 +0000 Sonya Besteiro http://blog.oceanconservancy.org/?p=7690

When nylon was created in 1938, few people realized the impact this new material would have on fishing. By the late 1950s, manufacturers were producing a single strand of monofilament plastic that would quickly become the most popular fishing line.

Unfortunately, the very properties that make monofilament line so beneficial for fishermen – durability, strength, clarity – can make it an environmental hazard.

Birds, fish and mammals are routinely tangled in discarded fishing line, which can injure or kill them. Derelict fishing line also puts people at risk, entangling beachgoers and divers and damaging boats or other equipment.

Proper disposal of old or damaged fishing line is vital to prevent these dangers. North Carolina Big Sweep’s (NC Big Sweep) monofilament fishing line recycling program encourages fishermen, boaters and marinas to recycle fishing line before it enters the environment.

“Recycling gives a second life to monofilament line, reduces problems with litter and earns positive publicity,” explains Judy Bolin, president of NC Big Sweep.

The NC Big Sweep monofilament recycling initiative began as a pilot project in 2004 with funding from the Southeast Atlantic Marine Debris Initiative and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Working with the North Carolina Clean Marina Program – a voluntary program that recognizes environmentally responsible marinas – Bolin serves as a conduit between marinas and monofilament recycling resources.

“The marinas are the ones who commit to recycle the monofilament line,” she says.

To participate, marinas must install special containers for patrons to safely store and discard unwanted fishing line. Marina staff monitor and maintain the containers and record the amount of fishing line being recycled. Bolin provides marina operators with an initial container and contact information for recycling centers.

Southport Marina joined the NC Big Sweep program in 2012. For marina manager Hank Whitley, the decision was easy. “As a certified Clean Marina, we are committed to doing our part to keep our environment clean and litter-free,” he explains.

Southport currently has three recycling containers and has collected a large amount of fishing line. With little to no maintenance and only weekly monitoring required, Whitley is pleased that the stations have been minimally invasive to marina operations.

“There is no logical reason for a marina not to join this program,” he states. “The benefits far outweigh the negatives.”

More than 100 marinas currently participate in the recycling program; Bolin would like to see that number grow. “Ideally, I would love to have all marinas involved,” she says. “For now, I’d like to get funding to add 50 more marinas to the project.”

Monofilament recycling is only one of many good boating practices boaters and marinas can implement. Ocean Conservancy’s Good Mate program provides simple, easy-to-follow guidelines for green boating. Visit www.oceanconservancy.org/goodmate for more information.

 

 

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