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The Blog Aquatic

News, opinions, photos and facts from Ocean Conservancy

About Brett Nolan

Brett Nolan is a digital outreach coordinator at Ocean Conservancy's DC office. Growing up outside of Boston, he spent many summers swimming and boating in New Hampshire's Ossipee Lake. He became passionate about our ocean when he learned the negative affects a coal-fired power plant was having on Salem Harbor. When he's not at the office, Brett enjoys freelance writing and exploring DC.

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World Leaders Talk Problems and Solutions at the Our Ocean Conference

Posted On June 19, 2014 by

Photo: Ocean Conservancy

Secretary of State John Kerry recently hosted the Our Ocean Conference at the Department of State earlier this week. Secretary Kerry invited world leaders, scientists, activists, and ocean lovers to come together to learn more about overfishing, marine debris and ocean acidification. The conference didn’t just focus on the problems of today. Governments, nonprofits and private businesses all offered solutions for tomorrow.

Ocean Conservancy was honored to attend and participate in the conference. Andreas Merkl, our president and CEO, spoke on the panel about marine debris. He echoed the threats plastic poses to marine life and how we can work together to make our seas trash free. Alexis Valauri-Orton, an intern for our ocean acidification program, presented on her travels and how ocean acidification could potentially affect coastal communities all over the world. And I was lucky enough to live tweet all the excitement from the front row of the main room! Below are the major takeaways from the Our Ocean Conference.

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Happy Father’s Day!

Posted On June 14, 2014 by

Today is dedicated to celebrating all the amazing dads in the world. However, human dads aren’t the only spectacular paternal figures in nature. Here are some examples of great ocean dads who might be as incredible as your dad.

Emperor Penguins

After traveling over 60 miles inland on Antarctica and laying her egg, the female emperor penguin makes the long journey back to the ocean to hunt for food. This leaves the male emperor penguin to care for the egg for two months. Trying to breed in the Antarctic winter was the easy part for these dads. The male will carefully keep his egg covered by his feathered skin, called a brood pouch, to protect it from the extreme Antarctic cold of June and July. While caring for the egg, this penguin dad will forgo eating to ensure his baby’s safety. By the time mom comes back two months later, the male emperor penguin may have lost nearly half of his body weight. Since fat is the main way that emperor penguins stay warm, it’s a testament to these dads’ devotion to their young that they’re able to endure the Antarctic cold on half their body weight. Once reunited, penguin parents share the responsibility of taking care of their chick by taking turns feeding it and keeping it warm.

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Don’t Forget the Ocean on Earth Day

Posted On April 22, 2014 by

As you celebrate Earth Day, don’t forget that over 70 percent of the Earth’s surface is under the ocean—it makes up 99 percent of the living space on our planet, and is home to half of all species on Earth! More than 2.6 billion people depend on the ocean as their primary source for protein.

Even if your home is landlocked and you don’t eat fish, the ocean is a key part of your life. Did you know that half of all the oxygen in the atmosphere comes from the ocean? The ocean is so important to us; please join me in celebrating it today. And share the ocean love by sending an Earth Day ecard to your friends!

With serious threats from plastic pollution to ocean acidification facing this vital resource, Earth Day is also a great time to take action to protect the ocean!

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Honoring the Women Who Fight for Our Ocean (Part 3)

Posted On March 31, 2014 by

In honor of Women’s History Month, Ocean Conservancy will be publishing a three-part series highlighting some of the amazing women who study and protect our ocean. 

Dr. Anne Salomon

Dr. Anne Salomon grew up right by the sea in Vancouver, British Columbia, and it’s where she fell in love with the coast and the outdoors. She studied general biology at the landlocked campus of Queen’s University. She missed the coast and went west for her master’s degree at the University of British Columbia where she studied marine ecology. After completing that degree, Salomon was U.S. bound and received her Ph.D. in zoology.

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